Wednesday, January 10, 2007

Wuthering, EVP and knitting.

1. The noise of the wind howling round the oast, and feeling secure and warm because it is outside and I am not.

2. The reaction of our website contractor when I told him that just after their phone line dropped halfway through our conversation, I heard an electronic voice phenomenon saying: 'Doom.' He said: 'I'm going to report that to our service providers. It just shouldn't happen. Was it a distinct voice?'

3. Rumaging through a large Aragon Yarns box to choose wool for my new typing gloves. I'm doing them in heron and raspberry.

12 comments:

  1. Some people just dont get sarcasm eh!!

    Love your blog Claire. Keep up the good work.

    And hello from Australia.

    :}

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  2. Clare
    I don't mean to criticise your spelling, but you gave me a giggle so I thought I'd let you know. I'm pretty sure you meant the wind was howling around the coast. Or I guess it could have been howling round the toast, or the roast. Unlikely though. So then I looked up oast, being the word imp that I am. And there is such a thing! So maybe the wind was really howling around your hop-drying kiln. That would make more sense. Hi, anyway. It's been windy and raining here too, despite being mid summer.

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  3. Forgot to mention our family loves 50 First Dates as well. Have you seen Click? I recommend it. Love and laughter. Enjoyed your New Year message on an earlier post too. I'm getting those magnets installed pronto!

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  4. Rainbowspirit -- I wonder if you mean I didn't get the website man's sarcasm, or he didn't get my sarcasm?! I really did hear one of those EVP voices saying 'Doom'! You know how one makes any mysterious whispering noise into a voice...

    Word imp -- I actually work in a converted oast. The cowl on top creaks alarmingly in high wind, and it has strange cone-shaped meeting rooms with odd acoustics.

    The Phantom -- they are like mittens but with no fingers, and long sleeves. They keep you warm if (like me) you have to work in a cold room.

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  5. Clare
    Thanks heaps for clarifying the meaning of oast. I'll add that to my list of things I now know. I've always liked to idea of living and/or working in buildings not originally meant as houses i.e. lighthouse, warehouse, stables etc. So I'm jealous that you work in an oast. Also, my other entry on your blog was actually meant for Rainbowspirit. I'm not sure how I posted it here instead! I think it was something to do with the time of night I was blogging. All the best.

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  6. Lol, i meant your sarcasm to him, but did you really hear the word??? Freaky. Maybe it was a message from your angels.... I would be a little concerned if I were you!

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  7. do you really work in a converted oast? that's interesting. will you be writing a children's story titled "Ghosts of the Haunted Oast" anytime soon?

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  8. typing gloves, eh? i'm not sure what those are, but i must say, the image of Bob Cratchit with his fingerless gloves slowly pinching through pennies comes to mind. and then i tell myself, "naw, Molly! it's 2006! surely britain has heaters, insulation and non-leaky windows, now." please tell me you do have these things!

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  9. Hi Clare, I was going to ask 'typing gloves?' myself, and just saw that another commentor had already done so.

    The fingers also get cold though, so maybe you can make some with the finger sections seaching halfway up the fingers, that way, only a bit of the fingers would be cold...

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  10. Here is a link to some typist-type gloves - there are no fingers at all, not even the short ones of 'fingerless' gloves!
    http://knitty.com/ISSUEsummer06/PATTfetching.html
    I'm working on a simple pattern to use with Aragon Yarns too, should be avail in the next few weeks.

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  11. I used to have cello lessons in an oast!

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